It’s time for HR to take a Stand #NoRetaliation.

In this time of daily reports of long term patterns of sexual harassment in the workplace, I have spoken to many HR professionals who feel they are walking a tightrope. On one hand, they are in support of employees bringing forth harassment issues to be dealt with appropriately. And on the other, having several employees bringing forth complaints all at once is not good for the company culture or reputation. Not to mention the amount of time and effort it takes to conduct multiple workplace investigations all at the same time. So, most are remaining silent. They’re not supporting the #MeToo groups, nor are they initiating talks with managers and executives about bringing open discussion out to the workforce. As a professional who worked directly with employee relations and investigations for a couple of decades, it is my opinion that to make a real impact, not just in the media but inside our organizations large and small, it is time for HR to support protections for those who come forward in good faith to disbar their fears of reporting these incidents. #NoRetaliation.

As we all know, until an issue has been investigated, we really do not know what happened or whether a law or even a conduct violation has been committed. Often when conducting an investigation, the doors to frank conversations are opened, and issues can be resolved by just allowing an offended employee to be heard. And sometimes the actions are severe enough to warrant termination. But we can’t investigate until we know there are problems. And we won’t know there are problems until employees feel safe enough to talk about the issues. And employees won’t feel safe until HR takes a stand that any employee bringing up these issues or incidents in good faith will NOT face poor treatment, reduced promotional opportunities or lose their job. #NoRetaliation.

For many years, both women and men who have been subject to harassment on the job, have kept quiet. They have continued to work, in the job where the offense happened or another job. But the impact of the harassment does not go away. It festers. It impacts their daily work life and their ability to engage with their co-workers and managers. And when the employee does decide to come forward, it has historically been by filing a lawsuit. But that is beginning to change. As we have heard in the news, even just this week with the news of the firing of Matt Lauer of the Today show, employees are beginning got feel empowered to come forward, simply asking that the company take the right steps and hold these people accountable for their actions. The victimized employees generally keep the incident to themselves until something triggers them to come forward. HR can be that trigger.  HR needs to be that trigger in order to begin to see change. #NoRetaliation.

As the CEO of a company that provides an online platform for workplace investigations, I spend the majority of my work day talking with HR professionals about Sexual Harassment claims, reports, investigations and prevention methods. I am constantly surprised by the number of HR professionals that state there has never been any form of harassment in their workplace. Or that their company has never had the need to conduct an investigation. Sometimes these are companies with 100 employees and sometimes they are companies with several thousand employees. But recent statistics tell us that approximately 75% percent of women and 20 percent of men have experienced harassment on the job. And most incidents are never reported. Yes, some industries are more likely than others to have a high claim rate. But if you have employees, and you have no conversations with employees regarding potential harassment in the workplace, you are likely missing something. #No Retaliation.

You may be asking, “What can I do that will make a difference?” Join us in the movement for #NoRetaliation by taking the following steps:

Human Resources Professionals: Start spreading the word within your organization that you welcome open discussions about any potential harassment taking place. That employees at any level are encouraged to come forward and make a difference.  Work with your EAP to allow for private counseling or coaching on how to deal with past incidents. Put up posters, initiate a hotline or email reporting outlet, and add brief discussions into all staff meetings for a quick review of conduct expectations. Make clear statements about what harassment behaviors look like. Provide monthly discussion groups that brainstorm ways to prevent incorrect behaviors within the organization and allow for early intervention. And make it well know that you stand for #NoRetaliation.

Managers and Executives: Show in both your speech and actions that you support the company “Zero Tolerance for Harassment” policies and will hold people accountable for their actions. Partner with HR to actively develop a means of open communication that fits within your company culture. Provide opportunities for your direct reports to talk about what is and is not working in the workplace. Take action early when made aware of any misconduct. And make it well know that you stand for #NoRetaliation.

Employee: You must be willing to bring issues to management in order to stop harassing behaviors. This includes observances of others being harassed. You can encourage others to do the same. Remember, if you or another employee is being harassed, chances are that you are not the first or last. It is time take back our workplace and create a better work day for everyone. #No Retaliation.

I appreciate all of the victims out there that have come forward.

I appreciate all of the companies that have and are standing up to protect their workers from harassment.

I appreciate those who have admitted to their past poor conduct, are apologizing and getting help.

And I appreciate you for choosing to now be a part of the solution moving forward by encouraging open communication and reporting of harassment in the workplace with #NoRetaliation!

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